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Java requirements

Java requirements

There are separate run and job execution requirements for Jenkins installations.

Running Jenkins system

Jenkins requires Java 11 or 17 since Jenkins 2.357 and LTS 2.361.1. Read more about this in the announcement blog post.

Upgrading Java version to 11

Upgrading an existing Jenkins setup from Java 8 to Java 11? Refer to the upgrade guidelines.

Running Jenkins on Java 11 in Docker

Java 11 Docker installation instructions are included in "Downloading and running Jenkins in Docker". Alternatively, the jenkins/jenkins:jdk17 Docker image allows you to run the Jenkins controller on Java 17.

All other Java versions are not supported.

These requirements apply to all components of the Jenkins system, including the Jenkins controller, all types of agents, CLI clients, and other components.

The Jenkins project performs a full test flow with the following JDK/JREs:

  • OpenJDK JDK / JRE 11 - 64 bits

  • OpenJDK JDK / JRE 17 - 64 bits

JRE/JDKs from other vendors are supported and may be used. Refer to our issue tracker for known Java compatibility issues.

Running Java-based tools and builds on Jenkins

The version of the JDK used to build Java-based projects, or the version of Java used to run Java-based tools is independent from the version of Java used to run the Jenkins controller and agent processes. During a build, any version of the JRE or JDK can be launched as long as it’s compatible with the system the build is running on. This includes:

  • Execution of java or javac from shell build steps and similar

  • Execution of Maven/Ant/… build steps using a JDK managed by a JDK tool installer

A few plugins have more strict requirements, generally requiring that a build is executing in the same version of Java as is used to run the Jenkins controller and agents. A notable example of that is Maven Integration Plugin, which requires that the version of the JDK used for the Maven build must be at least the same version as is used for the Jenkins controller. These cases are generally documented in the plugin documentation.

Monitoring Java versions

Modern versions of Jenkins controllers and Jenkins agents verify Java requirements and notify users when they are launched with an unsupported version.

The Versions Node Monitors plugin provides detailed Java version monitoring.

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Linux Support Policy

Linux Support Policy

This page documents the Linux support policy for the Jenkins controller and agents.

Scope

Individual Jenkins plugins may set additional requirements for Linux versions on controllers and/or agents. This page does not document such requirements. Please refer to plugin documentation for additional requirements.

Why?

Theoretically, Jenkins can run everywhere where you can run a supported Java version, but there are some limitations in practice. Jenkins core and some plugins include native code or depend on Linux API and subsystems and hence they rely on specific Linux versions. Jenkins platform specific installation packages rely on specific Linux versions.

Support levels

We define multiple support levels for Linux platforms.

Support level Description Platforms

Level 1 - Supported

We run automated package manager installation testing for these platforms and we intend to fix the reported issues in a timely manner. We recommend either package manager based installations or container based installations for Linux. Installations may also use jenkins.war without a package manager, though our automated testing focuses on package manager and container installations.

Level 2 - Patches considered

Support may have limitations and extra requirements. We do not test compatibility, and we may drop support at any time. We consider patches that do not put level 1 support at risk and do not create maintenance overhead.

  • 32-bit (x86, arm) Linux versions

  • RISC-V and other architectures not included in level 1 support

  • Preview releases

Level 3 - Unsupported

These versions are known to be incompatible or to have severe limitations. We do not support the listed platforms and we do not accept patches.

  • Linux versions no longer supported by operating system providers

Contributing

You are welcome to propose PR’s that add support for other Linux platforms or to share feedback; we will appreciate your contributions! Linux support in Jenkins is Platform Special Interest Group which has a chat, a mailing list, and regular meetings. You are welcome to join these channels.

Version history

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Servlet Container Support Policy

Servlet Container Support Policy

This page documents the servlet container support policy for the Jenkins controller.

Why?

Jenkins is typically run as a standalone application in its own process. The Jenkins WAR file bundles Winstone, a Jetty servlet container wrapper, and can be started on any operating system or platform with a version of Java supported by Jenkins. This is the preferred way to deploy Jenkins and is fully supported.

Theoretically, Jenkins can also be run as a servlet in a traditional servlet container like Apache Tomcat or WildFly, but in practice this is largely untested and there are many caveats. In particular, support for WebSocket agents is only implemented for the Jetty servlet container.

Support for traditional servlet containers may be discontinued in the future.

Support levels

We define multiple support levels for servlet containers.

Support level Description Servlet containers

Level 1: Supported

We run automated testing for these servlet containers, and we intend to fix reported issues in a timely manner.

The versions of Winstone and Jetty bundled in the Jenkins WAR file.

Level 2: Patches considered

Support may have limitations and extra requirements. We do not regularly test compatibility, and we may drop support at any time. We consider patches that do not put Level 1 support at risk and do not create maintenance overhead.

  • Tomcat 9, based on Servlet API 4.0 (Jakarta EE 8) with javax.servlet imports.

  • WildFly 26, based on Servlet API 4.0 (Jakarta EE 8) with javax.servlet imports.

  • Other servlet containers that are based on Servlet API 4.0 (Jakarta EE 8) with javax.servlet imports.

Level 3: Unsupported

These versions are known to be incompatible or to have severe limitations. We do not support the listed servlet containers.

  • Jetty 11 or later, based on Servlet API 5.0 (Jakarta EE 9) or later with jakarta.servlet imports.

  • Tomcat 10 or later, based on Servlet API 5.0 (Jakarta EE 9) or later with jakarta.servlet imports.

  • WildFly 27 or later, based on Servlet API 5.0 (Jakarta EE 9) or later with jakarta.servlet imports.

  • Other servlet containers that are based on Servlet API 5.0 (Jakarta EE 9) or later with jakarta.servlet imports.

Contributing

You are welcome to propose PRs that add support or documentation for other servlet containers or to share feedback; we will appreciate your contributions! Servlet container support in Jenkins falls under the Platform Special Interest Group which has a chat, a mailing list, and regular meetings. You are welcome to join these channels.

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Upgrading Jenkins Java version from 8 to 11

Upgrading Jenkins Java version from 8 to 11

There are a few details and steps to upgrade the JVM used to run Jenkins, more specifically from Java 8 to Java 11.

If you’re upgrading the JVM used to run Jenkins, and particularly if you’re upgrading from Java 8 to Java 11, there are some details you should know and precautions you should take.

Backup

As with any upgrade, we recommend backing up JENKINS_HOME and testing the upgrade with the backup before performing the upgrade on your production instance.

Upgrading Jenkins

If you need to upgrade Jenkins as well as the JVM, we recommend that you:

  1. Back up JENKINS_HOME

  2. Upgrade Jenkins to the most recent version

    • How you upgrade Jenkins is dependent upon your original Jenkins installation method.

    • We recommend that you use the package manager of your system (such as apt or yum).

  3. Validate the upgrade to confirm that all plugins and jobs are loaded

  4. Upgrade the required plugins (see Upgrading Plugins)

  5. Make a second backup of JENKINS_HOME after upgrading Jenkins and the required plugins

  6. Stop the Jenkins instance

  7. Upgrade the JVM on which Jenkins is running

    • Use a package manager to install the new JVM.

    • Make sure the default JVM is the newly installed version. If it is not, run systemctl edit jenkins and set either the JAVA_HOME environment variable or the JENKINS_JAVA_CMD environment variable.

Starting with the Jenkins 2.357 weekly release and the Long Term Support release 2.361.1, Java 11 or Java 17 is required.

Upgrading Plugins

It’s important not just to upgrade Jenkins and the JVM, but also to upgrade the plugins which support Java 11. Plugin upgrades assure compatibility with the most recent Jenkins releases.

If you discover a previously unreported issue, please let us know: read how to report an issue for guidance.

Jakarta XML Binding

Some plugins use JAXB libraries provided by the JDK. However, the java.xml.bind and javax.activation modules are no longer included in OpenJDK 11, and plugins might fail if no replacement is offered.

To fix this problem, we’ve bundled those libraries into a new detached plugin: JAXB plugin. When any Jenkins core more recent than 2.163 is running on Java 11, this plugin is automatically installed. However, if you manage your plugins outside Jenkins, for example, if you use plugins.txt in your Docker images, you might need to install the plugin explicitly.

JVM version on agents

All agents must be running on the same JVM version as the controller due to how controllers and agents communicate. If you’re upgrading your Jenkins controller to run on Java 11, you also need to upgrade the JVM on your agents.

You can validate the version of each agent with the Versions Node Monitors plugin. This plugin provides information about the JVM version of each agent on the node management screen of your Jenkins instance. You can also configure this plugin to automatically disconnect any agent with an incorrect JVM version.

Java Web Start

Java Web Start has been removed in Java 11. When a Jenkins controller runs on Java 11, the Java Web Start button will no longer appear in the Web UI. You can’t launch agents for a Java 11 Jenkins server from a *.jnlp file downloaded to a web browser.

There are no plans to replace this functionality. Connect agents to Jenkins on Java 11 with plugins like SSH Build Agents Plugin, with operating system command line calls to java -jar agent.jar, or using containers.

JDK Tool Automatic installer

Oracle JDK 11 licensing prevents the Jenkins community from listing the Oracle JDKs. Because of this licensing restriction, Oracle JDK 11 can’t be automatically installed by Jenkins. This problem is tracked in the issue JENKINS-54305.

As an alternative, we encourage you to use containers based on images that contain all the tooling needed for your builds.

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Browser compatibility

Browser compatibility

This page documents the browser support policy in the Jenkins automation server. It does not apply to the Jenkins website or other services hosted by the Jenkins project.

Support model

Jenkins web browser support falls into one of three classes:

  1. Level 1:  Aim to proactively fix these browsers and provide an equal UX across all.

  2. Level 2:  Accept patches to fix issues and make the best effort to ensure there is at least one way to do any action.

  3. Level 3:  No guarantees. We will accept patches, but only if they are low risk. This is the default unless a browser/version is listed below.

We do not claim any compatibility with or accept bug reports and patches for pre-release (e.g., alpha, beta, or canary) versions of browsers.

Browser compatibility matrix

Browser Level 1 Level 2 Level 3

Google Chrome

Latest regular release/patch

Version N-1, latest patch

Other versions

Mozilla Firefox

Latest regular release/patch; Latest ESR release

Version N-1, latest patch

Other versions 

Microsoft Edge

Latest regular release/patch

Version N-1, latest patch

Other versions

Apple Safari

Latest regular release/patch

Version N-1, latest patch

Other versions

Support for mobile browsers (e.g. iOS Safari) has not yet been determined.

Change history

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Windows Support Policy

Windows Support Policy

This page documents the Windows support policy for the Jenkins server and agents.

Scope

Jenkins plugins, e.g., WMI Windows Agents, may set additional requirements to Windows versions on controllers and/or agents. This page does not document such requirements. Please refer to plugin documentation.

Why?

Theoretically, Jenkins can run everywhere where you can run a supported Java version, but there are some limitations in practice. Jenkins core and some plugins include native code or depend on Windows API and subsystems, and hence they rely on specific Windows platforms and versions. In Windows services, we also use Windows Service Wrapper (WinSW), which requires .NET Framework.

Support levels

We define multiple support levels for Windows platforms.

Support level Description Platforms

Level 1 - Full support

We run automated testing for these platforms, and we intend to fix the reported issues timely.

  • 64-bit (amd-64) Windows Server versions, with the latest GA update pack

  • Windows versions used in the official Docker images

Level 2 - Supported

We do not actively test these platforms, but we intend to keep compatibility. We are happy to accept patches.

  • 64-bit (amd-64) Windows Server versions generally supported by Microsoft

  • 64-bit (amd-64) Windows 10 versions generally supported by Microsoft

Level 3 - Patches considered

Support may have limitations and extra requirements. We do not test compatibility, and we may drop support if there is a need. We will consider patches if they do not put Level 1/2 support at risk and do not create maintenance overhead.

  • 64-bit Windows versions no longer supported by Microsoft

  • x86 and other non-amd64 architectures

  • Non-mainstream versions, e.g., Windows Embedded

  • Preview releases

  • Windows API emulation engines, e.g., Wine or ReactOS

Level 4 - Unsupported

These versions are known to be incompatible or to have severe limitations. We do not support the listed platforms, and we will not accept patches.

  • Windows XP older than SP3

  • Windows Phone

  • Other Windows platforms released before 2008

.NET Requirements

  • Starting from Jenkins 2.238, .NET Framework 4.0 or above is required for all Windows service installations and built-in Windows service management logic.

  • Before Jenkins 2.238, .NET Framework 2.0 was supported

  • For platforms that do not support these versions, consider using Native executables provided by the Windows Service Wrapper project.

Contributing

If you would like to add support for more Windows platforms or to share feedback, we will appreciate your contributions! Windows support in Jenkins is Platform Special Interest Group which has a chat, a mailing list, and regular meetings. You are welcome to join these channels.

Version history

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Activity View

Activity View

The Blue Ocean Activity view shows all activities related to one Pipeline.

Blue Ocean status

Blue Ocean will not receive further functionality updates. Blue Ocean will continue to provide easy-to-use Pipeline visualization, but it will not be enhanced further. It will only receive selective updates for significant security issues or functional defects.

The Activity view includes the standard navigation bar at the top and a local navigation bar below it.

Navigation bars from the Activity view

The local navigation bar includes:

Activity

The default tab of the Activity view shows a list of the latest completed or active runs. Each line represents the status of a run, run ID, commit information, and when the run completed.

Default activity tab view of the Activity view

  • Selecting a run will bring up the Pipeline run details to provide Pipeline visualization.

  • Active runs can be aborted from this list by selecting the stop icon, which is represented by a ◾ within a circle.

  • Runs that have been completed can be re-run by selecting the re-run icon ↺.

  • The list can be filtered by branch using the "Branch" drop-down in the list header. Branch filter in Blue Ocean activity view

This view does not allow runs to be edited or marked as favorites. To perform these actions, select the Branches tab.

Branches

The Branches tab shows a list of all branches that have a completed or active run in the current Pipeline. Each line in the list corresponds to a branch in source control, displaying the overall health of the branch based on the status of the most recent run, branch name, commit information, and when the run completed.

Branches tab of Activity view

Selecting a branch brings up the Pipeline run details for the latest completed or active run of that branch.

  1. Pipelines where the latest run has been completed can be run again by selecting the run icon, represented by a in a circle.

    • Active runs can be aborted, and display a stop icon, which is represented by a ◾ within a circle.

  2. Selecting the history icon allows you to view the run history for that branch.

  3. The edit icon, represented by a , opens the Pipeline editor for that branch.

  4. The favorite ☆ icon adds a branch to your favorites list on the dashboard. On the dashboard a branch listed under favorites displays a solid star ★. Deselecting the star removes the branch from the favorites list.

Pull Requests

The Pull Requests tab displays a list of all pull requests for the current Pipeline, that have a completed or active run. Each line in the list corresponds to a pull request in source control, which displays the status of the most recent run, run ID, summary, author, and when the run completed.

Activity Pull Requests view

Blue Ocean displays pull requests and branches separately, but the lists behave similarly. Selecting a pull request in this list will bring up the Pipeline run details for the latest completed or active run of that pull request.

  • Active runs can be aborted from this list by selecting the stop icon, which is represented by a ◾ within a circle.

  • Pull requests whose latest run has been completed can be run again by selecting the run icon, represented by a in a circle.

The pull request list does not display health icons, and pull requests cannot be edited or marked as favorites.

By default, when a pull request is closed, Jenkins removes the Pipeline from Jenkins, and runs for that pull request are no longer accessible from Jenkins. The Pipelines removed in this way will need to be cleaned up in the future. This can be changed by adjusting the configuration of the underlying multi-branch Pipeline job.


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Creating a Pipeline

Creating a Pipeline

Blue Ocean makes it easy to create a Pipeline project in Jenkins.

You can generate a Pipeline from an existing Jenkinsfile in source control, or you can use the Blue Ocean Pipeline editor to create a Pipeline as a Jenkinsfile that is committed to source control.

Blue Ocean status

Blue Ocean will not receive further functionality updates. Blue Ocean will continue to provide easy-to-use Pipeline visualization, but it will not be enhanced further. It will only receive selective updates for significant security issues or functional defects.

Alternative options for Pipeline visualization, such as the Pipeline: Stage View and Pipeline Graph View plugins, are available and offer some of the same functionality. While not complete replacements for Blue Ocean, contributions are encouraged from the community for continued development of these plugins.

The Pipeline syntax snippet generator assists users as they define Pipeline steps with their arguments. It is the preferred tool for Jenkins Pipeline creation, as it provides online help for the Pipeline steps available in your Jenkins controller. It uses the plugins installed on your Jenkins controller to generate the Pipeline syntax. Refer to the Pipeline steps reference page for information on all available Pipeline steps.

Setting up your Pipeline project

To start setting up your Pipeline project in Blue Ocean, select the New Pipeline button at the top-right of the Blue Ocean Dashboard.

New Pipeline Button

If your Jenkins instance is new or has no Pipeline projects or other items configured, Blue Ocean displays a Welcome to Jenkins message that allows you to select the Create a new Pipeline option to start setting up your Pipeline project.

Welcome to Jenkins - Create a New Pipeline message box

You now have a choice of creating your new Pipeline project from a:

For a Git repository

To create your Pipeline project for a Git repository, click the Git button under Where do you store your code?

Where do you store your code

In the Connect to a Git repository section, enter the URL for your Git repository in the Repository URL field.

Connect to a Git repository

You now must specify a local or remote repository from which to build your Pipeline project.

Local repository

If your URL is a local directory path beginning with a forward slash /, such as /home/cloned-git-repos/my-git-repo.git, you can proceed to select the Create Pipeline option.

Blue Ocean then scans your local repository’s branches for a Jenkinsfile, and starts a Pipeline run for each branch containing a Jenkinsfile. If Blue Ocean cannot find a Jenkinsfile, you are prompted to create one through the Pipeline editor.

Local repositories are typically limited to file system access and are normally only available from the controller node. Local repositories are also known to require more complicated path names on Windows than most users want to manage. Users are advised to run jobs on agents, rather than running them directly on the controller. Therefore, you should use a remote repository rather than a local repository for the best Blue Ocean experience.

Remote repository

Since the Pipeline editor saves edited Pipelines to Git repositories as `Jenkinsfile`s, Blue Ocean only supports connections to remote Git repositories over the SSH protocol.

If your URL is for a remote Git repository, be sure your URL starts with either:

  • ssh:// - which displays as ssh://gituser@git-server-url/git-server-repos-group/my-git-repo.git
    or

  • user@host:path/to/git/repo.git - which displays as gituser@git-server-url:git-server-repos-group/my-git-repo.git

Blue Ocean automatically generates an SSH public/private key pair or provides you with an existing pair for the current Jenkins user. This credential is automatically registered in Jenkins with the following details for this Jenkins user:

  • Domain: blueocean-private-key-domain

  • ID: jenkins-generated-ssh-key

  • Name: <jenkins-username> (jenkins-generated-ssh-key)

You must ensure that this SSH public/private key pair is registered with your Git server before continuing.

If you have not already done this, follow these two steps.

  1. Configure the SSH public key component of this key pair (which you can copy and paste from the Blue Ocean interface) for the remote Git server’s user account (e.g., within the authorized_keys file of the machine’s gituser/.ssh directory).

    This process allows your Jenkins user to access the repositories that your Git server’s user account has access to. Refer to the "Setting Up the Server" of the Pro Git documentation.
  2. Return to the Blue Ocean interface.

Select the Create Pipeline option.

Blue Ocean scans your local repository’s branches for a Jenkinsfile and starts a Pipeline run for each branch containing a Jenkinsfile. If Blue Ocean does not find a Jenkinsfile you are prompted to create one through the Pipeline editor.

For a repository on GitHub

To create your Pipeline project directly for a repository on GitHub, select the GitHub option under Where do you store your code?.

Where do you store your code

In the Connect to GitHub section, enter your GitHub access token into the Your GitHub access token field.
If you previously configured Blue Ocean to connect to GitHub using a personal access token, Blue Ocean takes you directly to the GitHub account/organization and repository choice steps below:

Connect to GitHub

If you do not have a GitHub access token, select the Create an access key here option to open GitHub to the New personal access token page.

Create your access token

  1. In the new tab, sign in to your GitHub account. On the New Personal Access Token page, specify a brief Token description for your GitHub access token, such as Blue Ocean.

    An access token is usually an alphanumeric string that represents your GitHub account, along with permissions to access various GitHub features and areas through your GitHub account. The new access token process, initiated by selecting Create an access key here, has the appropriate permissions pre-selected that Blue Ocean requires to access and interact with your GitHub account.
  2. Scroll down to the end of the page, and select Generate token.

  3. On the resulting Personal access tokens page, copy your newly generated access token.

  4. Back in Blue Ocean, paste the access token into the Your GitHub access token field, and then select Connect.

Your current Jenkins user now has access to your GitHub account and you can now choose your GitHub account/organization and repository. Jenkins registers this credential with the following details for this Jenkins user:

  • Domain: blueocean-github-domain

  • ID: github

  • Name: <jenkins-username>/****** (GitHub Access Token)

Choose your GitHub account/organization and repository

Blue Ocean prompts you to choose your GitHub account or an organization you are a member of. You are also asked for the repository containing your Pipeline project.

  1. In the Which organization does the repository belong to? section, select either:

    • Your GitHub account, to create a Pipeline project for one of your own GitHub repositories or one which you have forked from elsewhere on GitHub.
      or

    • The organization of which you are a member, to create a Pipeline project for a GitHub repository located within this organization.

  2. In the Choose a repository section, select the repository within your GitHub account or organization from which to build your Pipeline project.

    If your list of repositories is long, you can use the Search option to filter your results.

Choose a repository

  1. Click Create Pipeline.

Blue Ocean scans your local repository’s branches for a Jenkinsfile and starts a Pipeline run for each branch containing a Jenkinsfile. If Blue Ocean does not find a Jenkinsfile, you are prompted to create one through the Pipeline editor.

Under the hood, a Pipeline project created through Blue Ocean is actually a "multibranch Pipeline." Therefore, Jenkins looks for the presence of at least one Jenkinsfile in any branch of your repository.

For a repository on Bitbucket Cloud

To create your Pipeline project directly for a Git or Mercurial repository on Bitbucket Cloud, select the Bitbucket Cloud button under Where do you store your code?

Where do you store your code

In the Connect to Bitbucket section, enter your Bitbucket email address and password into the Username and Password fields.

  • If you previously configured Blue Ocean to connect to Bitbucket with your email address and password, Blue Ocean takes you directly to the Bitbucket account/team and repository selection steps below.

  • If you entered these credentials, Jenkins registers them with the following details for this Jenkins user:

  • Domain: blueocean-bitbucket-cloud-domain

  • ID: bitbucket-cloud

  • Name: +<bitbucket-user@email.address>/ (Bitbucket server credentials)

Connect to Bitbucket

Select Connect and your current/logged in Jenkins user will now have access to your Bitbucket account. You can now choose your Bitbucket account/team and repository.

Choose your Bitbucket account/team and repository

Blue Ocean prompts you to choose your Bitbucket account or a team you are a member of, as well as the repository containing your project to be built.

  1. In the Which team does the repository belong to? section, select either:

    • Your Bitbucket account to create a Pipeline project for one of your own Bitbucket repositories, or one which you have forked from elsewhere on Bitbucket.

    • A team of which you are a member to create a Pipeline project for a Bitbucket repository located within this team.

  2. In the Choose a repository section, select the repository in your Bitbucket account or team from which to build your Pipeline project.

    If your list of repositories is long, you can filter this list using the Search option.

    Choose a repository

  3. Click Create Pipeline.

Blue Ocean scans your local repository’s branches for a Jenkinsfile and starts a Pipeline run for each branch containing a Jenkinsfile. If Blue Ocean does not find a Jenkinsfile, you are prompted to create one through the Pipeline editor.

Under the hood, a Pipeline project created through Blue Ocean is actually a "multibranch Pipeline." Therefore, Jenkins looks for the presence of at least one Jenkinsfile in any branch of your repository.


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Dashboard

Dashboard

Blue Ocean’s "Dashboard" is the default view when opening Blue Ocean. It disaplays an overview of all Pipeline projects configured on a Jenkins instance.

Blue Ocean status

Blue Ocean will not receive further functionality updates. Blue Ocean will continue to provide easy-to-use Pipeline visualization, but it will not be enhanced further. It will only receive selective updates for significant security issues or functional defects.

The Dashboard consists of a blue navigation bar at the top, the Pipelines list, and the Favorites list.

Overview of the Blue Ocean Dashboard

The Dashboard includes the blue navigation bar along the top of the interface.

The bar is divided into two sections:

  • A common section along the top.

  • A contextual section below.

    • The contextual section changes depending on the Blue Ocean page you are viewing.

When viewing the Dashboard, the navigation bar’s contextual section includes:

  • Search pipelines: This field allows users to filter the Pipelines list to match the text you enter into this field.

  • New Pipeline: This option begins the process of creating a Pipeline.

Pipelines list

The Pipelines list is the Dashboard’s default list. It is the only list displayed the first time Blue Ocean is accessed.

The list shows the overall state of each Pipeline configured in the Jenkins instance. The list can include other items configured in the Jenkins instance. The following information is displayed for each Pipeline listed:

  • The item’s NAME

  • The item’s HEALTH

  • The number of BRANCHES and pull requests (PRs) that are passing or failing within the Pipeline’s source control repository.

  • A ☆, indicating whether or not the item has been manually added to your current Jenkins Favorites list.

Selecting an item’s ☆ will toggle between:

  • Adding the default branch of the item’s repository to your Favorites list, which is indicated by a solid ★.

  • Removing the item’s default branch from this list, which is indicated by an outlined ☆.

Selecting an item in the Pipelines list will display that item’s Activity View.

Favorites list

The Favorites list appears above the Dashboard’s default Pipelines list when at least one Pipeline/item is present in your Favorites list.

This list provides key information and actions for a core subset of your accessible items in the Pipelines list. This key information includes the current run status for an item and its repository’s branch, the name of the branch, the initial part of the commit hash, and the last run time. This list also includes options to run or re-run the item on the indicated branch.

You should only add an item or branch to your Favorites list if it needs regular monitoring. Adding an item’s specific branch to your Favorites list can be done through the item’s Activity View.

Blue Ocean automatically adds branches and PRs to this list when they include a run that contains any modifications you have performed.

You can also manually remove items from your Favorites list by deselecting the solid ★ in this list. When there are no longer items in this list, the list is removed from the Dashboard. Selecting the favorite ★ for any item will bring the list back to your Dashboard.

Selecting an item in the Favorites list opens the Pipeline run details for the latest run on the branch or PR indicated.

Health icons

Blue Ocean represents the overall health of a Pipeline/item or one of its branches using weather icons. These icons change depending on the number of recent builds that have passed.

Health icons on the Dashboard represent overall Pipeline health, whereas the health icons in the Branches tab of the Activity View represent the overall health for each branch.

Table 1. Health icons (best to worst)
Icon Health

Sunny

Sunny, more than 80% of Runs passing

Partially Sunny

Partially Sunny, 61% to 80% of Runs passing

Cloudy

Cloudy, 41% to 60% of Runs passing

Raining

Raining, 21% to 40% of Runs passing

Storm

Storm, less than 21% of Runs passing

Run status

Blue Ocean represents the run status of a Pipeline/item or one of its branches using a consistent set of icons throughout.

Table 2. Run status icons
Icon Status

In Progress

In Progress

Passed

Passed

Unstable

Unstable

Failed

Failed

Aborted

Aborted



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Getting started with Blue Ocean

Getting started with Blue Ocean

This section describes how to get started with Blue Ocean in Jenkins. It includes instructions for setting up Blue Ocean on your Jenkins instance, how to access the Blue Ocean UI, and returning to the Jenkins classic UI.

Blue Ocean status

Blue Ocean will not receive further functionality updates. Blue Ocean will continue to provide easy-to-use Pipeline visualization, but it will not be enhanced further. It will only receive selective updates for significant security issues or functional defects.

Installing Blue Ocean

You can install Blue Ocean using the following methods:

On an existing Jenkins instance

When Jenkins is installed on most platforms, the Blue Ocean plugin and all necessary dependent plugins, which compile the Blue Ocean suite of plugins, are not installed by default.

Plugins can be installed on a Jenkins instance by any Jenkins user who has the Administer permission. This is set through Matrix-based security. Jenkins users with this permission can also configure the permissions of other users on their system. Refer to the Authorization section of Managing Security for more information.

To install the Blue Ocean suite of plugins to your Jenkins instance:

  1. Ensure you are logged in to Jenkins as a user with the Administer permission.

  2. From the Jenkins home page, select Manage Jenkins on the left and then Manage Plugins.

  3. Select the Available tab and enter blue ocean in the Filter text box. This filters the list of plugins based on the name and description.

    Available Blue Ocean plugins after being filtered list.

  4. Select the box to the left of Blue Ocean, and then select either the Download now and install after restart option (recommended) or the Install without restart option at the bottom of the page.

    • It is not necessary to select other plugins in this list. The main Blue Ocean plugin automatically selects and installs all dependent plugins, composing the Blue Ocean suite of plugins.

    • If you select the Install without restart option, you must restart Jenkins to gain full Blue Ocean functionality.

Refer to the the Managing Plugins page for more information. Blue Ocean does not require additional configuration after installation. Existing Pipelines and projects will continue to work as usual.

The first time you create a Pipeline in Blue Ocean for a specific Git server, Blue Ocean prompts you for your Git credentials to allow you to create Pipelines in the repositories. This is required since Blue Ocean can add a Jenkinsfile to your repositories.

As part of Jenkins in Docker

The Blue Ocean suite of plugins is not bundled with the official Jenkins Docker image, jenkins/jenkins, which is available from the Docker Hub repository.

Read more about running Jenkins and Blue Ocean inside Docker in the Docker section of the installing Jenkins page.

Accessing Blue Ocean

Once a Jenkins environment has Blue Ocean installed and you log in to the Jenkins classic UI, you can access the Blue Ocean UI by selecting Open Blue Ocean on the left side of the screen.

Open Blue Ocean link

Alternatively, you can access Blue Ocean directly by appending /blue to the end of your Jenkins server’s URL. For example https://jenkins-server-url/blue.

If your Jenkins instance:

  • Already has existing Pipeline projects or other items present, the Blue Ocean Dashboard displays.

  • Is new or does not have projects or other items configured, Blue Ocean displays a Welcome to Jenkins pane with a Create a new Pipeline button. You can select this to begin creating a new Pipeline project. For more information, refer to the Creating a Pipeline page for more information on creating a Pipeline project in Blue Ocean.

    Welcome to Jenkins - Create a New Pipeline message box

The Blue Ocean UI has a navigation bar along the top of its interface, allowing you to access the different views and features.

The navigation bar is divided into two sections:

  • A common section along the top of most Blue Ocean views.

  • A contextual section below.

The contextual section is specific to the current Blue Ocean page you are viewing.

The navigation bar’s common section includes the following buttons:

  • Jenkins: Selecting the Jenkins icon takes you to the Dashboard or reloads this page if you are already viewing it.

  • Pipelines: This also takes you to the Dashboard. If you are already on the Dashboard, this option reloads the page. This button serves a different purpose when you are viewing a Pipeline run details page.

  • Administration: This takes you to the Manage Jenkins page of the Jenkins classic UI. This button is not available if you do not have the Administer permission. Refer to the Authorization section of the Managing Security page for more information.

  • Go to classic icon: This takes you back to the Jenkins classic UI. Read more about this in Switching to the classic UI.

  • Logout: This logs out your current Jenkins user and returns you to the Jenkins login page.

Views that use the common navigation bar add another bar below it. This second bar includes options specific to that view. Some views replace the common navigation bar with one specifically suited to that view.

Switching to the classic UI

Blue Ocean does not support some legacy or administrative features of Jenkins that are necessary to some users.

If you need to access these features, select the Go to classic icon at the top of a common section of Blue Ocean’s navigation bar.

Go to classic icon

Selecting this button takes you to the equivalent page in the Jenkins classic UI or the most relevant classic UI page that parallels the current page in Blue Ocean.



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