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Using the GitLab Runner chart | GitLab





  • Requirements
  • Configuration
  • Deploying a stand-alone runner

  • Using Docker-in-Docker

    • Security concerns
  • Installation command line options
  • Default runner configuration
  • Chart configuration examples

Using the GitLab Runner chart

The GitLab Runner subchart provides a GitLab Runner for running CI jobs. It is enabled by default and should work out of the box with support for caching using s3 compatible object storage.

Requirements

This chart depends on the shared-secrets Job to populate its registrationToken for automatic registration. If you intend to run this chart as a stand-alone chart with an existing GitLab instance then you will need to manually set the registrationToken in the gitlab-runner secret to be equal to that displayed by the running GitLab instance.

Configuration

There are no required settings, it should work out of the box if you deploy all of the charts together.

Deploying a stand-alone runner

By default we do infer gitlabUrl , automatically generate a registration token, and generate it through the migrations chart. This behavior will not work if you intend to deploy it with a running GitLab instance.

In this case you will need to set gitlabUrl value to be the URL of the running GitLab instance. You will also need to manually create gitlab-runner secret and fill it with the registrationToken provided by the running GitLab.

Using Docker-in-Docker

In order to run Docker-in-Docker, the runner container needs to be privileged to have access to the needed capabilities. To enable it set the privileged value to true . See the upstream documentation in regards to why this is does not default to true .

Security concerns

Privileged containers have extended capabilities, for example they can mount arbitrary files from the host they run on. Make sure to run the container in an isolated environment such that nothing important runs beside it.

Installation command line options

























Parameter Description Default
gitlab-runner.image Runner image gitlab/gitlab-runner:alpine-v10.5.0
gitlab-runner.gitlabUrl URL that the Runner uses to register to GitLab Server GitLab external URL
gitlab-runner.install Install the gitlab-runner chart true
gitlab-runner.imagePullPolicy Image pull policy IfNotPresent
gitlab-runner.init.image.repository
initContainer image
gitlab-runner.init.image.tag
initContainer image tag
gitlab-runner.pullSecrets Secrets for the image repository
gitlab-runner.unregisterRunners Unregister all runners before termination true
gitlab-runner.concurrent Number of concurrent jobs 20
gitlab-runner.checkInterval Polling interval 30s
gitlab-runner.rbac.create Whether to create RBAC service account true
gitlab-runner.rbac.clusterWideAccess Deploy containers of jobs cluster-wide false
gitlab-runner.rbac.serviceAccountName Name of the RBAC service account to create default
gitlab-runner.runners.privileged Run in privileged mode, needed for dind
false
gitlab-runner.runners.cache.secretName Secret to access key and secret key from gitlab-minio
gitlab-runner.runners.config Runner configuration as string See below
gitlab-runner.resources.limits.cpu Runner CPU limit
gitlab-runner.resources.limits.memory Runner memory limit
gitlab-runner.resources.requests.cpu Runner requested CPU
gitlab-runner.resources.requests.memory Runner requested memory

Default runner configuration

The default runner configuration used in the GitLab chart has been customized to use the included MinIO for cache by default. If you are setting the runner config value, you will need to also configure your own cache configuration.

gitlab-runner:
runners:
config: |
[[runners]]
[runners.kubernetes]
image = "ubuntu:18.04"
{{- if .Values.global.minio.enabled }}
[runners.cache]
Type = "s3"
Path = "gitlab-runner"
Shared = true
[runners.cache.s3]
ServerAddress = {{ include "gitlab-runner.cache-tpl.s3ServerAddress" . }}
BucketName = "runner-cache"
BucketLocation = "us-east-1"
Insecure = false
{{ end }}

Chart configuration examples

Runners configuration to use only custom nameservers (exclude any cluster or host nameservers):

gitlab-runner:
runners:
config: |
[[runners]]
[runners.kubernetes]
image = "ubuntu:18.04"
dns_policy = "none"
[runners.kubernetes.dns_config]
nameservers = ["8.8.8.8"]

See the Runner chart additional configuration.

Using the GitLab Shell chart | GitLab





  • Requirements
  • Design Choices
  • Configuration
  • Installation command line options

  • Chart configuration examples

    • extraEnv
    • extraEnvFrom
    • image.pullSecrets
    • livenessProbe/readinessProbe
    • tolerations
    • annotations

  • External Services

    • Workhorse

  • Chart settings

    • hostKeys.secret
    • authToken
    • LoadBalancer Service
    • Configuring the networkpolicy
    • Example Network Policy

Using the GitLab Shell chart

The gitlab-shell sub-chart provides an SSH server configured for Git SSH access to GitLab.

Requirements

This chart depends on access to the Workhorse services, either as part of the
complete GitLab chart or provided as an external service reachable from the Kubernetes
cluster this chart is deployed onto.

Design Choices

In order to easily support SSH replicas, and avoid using shared storage for the SSH
authorized keys, we are using the SSH AuthorizedKeysCommand
to authenticate against the GitLab authorized keys endpoint. As a result, we don’t persist
or update the AuthorizedKeys file within these pods.

Configuration

The gitlab-shell chart is configured in two parts: external services,
and chart settings. The port exposed through Ingress is configured
with global.shell.port , and defaults to 22 . The Service’s external port is also
controlled by global.shell.port .

Installation command line options













































































Parameter Default Description
annotations Pod annotations
podLabels Supplemental Pod labels. Will not be used for selectors.
common.labels Supplemental labels that are applied to all objects created by this chart.
config.clientAliveInterval 0 Interval between keepalive pings on otherwise idle connections; the default value of 0 disables this ping
config.loginGraceTime 60 Specifies amount of time that the server will disconnect after if the user has not successfully logged in
config.maxStartups.full 100 SSHd refuse probability will increase linearly and all unauthenticated connection attempts would be refused when unauthenticated connections number will reach specified number
config.maxStartups.rate 30 SSHd will refuse connections with specified probability when there would be too many unauthenticated connections (optional)
config.maxStartups.start 10 SSHd will refuse connection attempts with some probability if there are currently more than the specified number of unauthenticated connections (optional)
config.proxyProtocol false Enable PROXY protocol support for the gitlab-sshd daemon
config.proxyPolicy "use" Specify policy for handling PROXY protocol. Value must be one of use, require, ignore, reject
config.proxyHeaderTimeout "500ms" The maximum duration gitlab-sshd will wait before giving up on reading the PROXY protocol header. Must include units: ms , s , or m .
config.ciphers [aes128-gcm@openssh.com, chacha20-poly1305@openssh.com, aes256-gcm@openssh.com, aes128-ctr, aes192-ctr, aes256-ctr] Specify the ciphers allowed.
config.kexAlgorithms [curve25519-sha256, curve25519-sha256@libssh.org, ecdh-sha2-nistp256, ecdh-sha2-nistp384, ecdh-sha2-nistp521, diffie-hellman-group14-sha256, diffie-hellman-group14-sha1] Specifies the available KEX (Key Exchange) algorithms.
config.macs [hmac-sha2-256-etm@openssh.com, hmac-sha2-512-etm@openssh.com, hmac-sha2-256, hmac-sha2-512, hmac-sha1] Specifies the available MAC (message authentication code algorithms.
deployment.livenessProbe.initialDelaySeconds 10 Delay before liveness probe is initiated
deployment.livenessProbe.periodSeconds 10 How often to perform the liveness probe
deployment.livenessProbe.timeoutSeconds 3 When the liveness probe times out
deployment.livenessProbe.successThreshold 1 Minimum consecutive successes for the liveness probe to be considered successful after having failed
deployment.livenessProbe.failureThreshold 3 Minimum consecutive failures for the liveness probe to be considered failed after having succeeded
deployment.readinessProbe.initialDelaySeconds 10 Delay before readiness probe is initiated
deployment.readinessProbe.periodSeconds 5 How often to perform the readiness probe
deployment.readinessProbe.timeoutSeconds 3 When the readiness probe times out
deployment.readinessProbe.successThreshold 1 Minimum consecutive successes for the readiness probe to be considered successful after having failed
deployment.readinessProbe.failureThreshold 2 Minimum consecutive failures for the readiness probe to be considered failed after having succeeded
deployment.strategy {} Allows one to configure the update strategy utilized by the deployment
deployment.terminationGracePeriodSeconds 30 Seconds that Kubernetes will wait for a pod to forcibly exit
enabled true Shell enable flag
extraContainers List of extra containers to include
extraInitContainers List of extra init containers to include
extraVolumeMounts List of extra volumes mounts to do
extraVolumes List of extra volumes to create
extraEnv List of extra environment variables to expose
extraEnvFrom List of extra environment variables from other data sources to expose
hpa.behavior {scaleDown: {stabilizationWindowSeconds: 300 }} Behavior contains the specifications for up- and downscaling behavior (requires autoscaling/v2beta2 or higher)
hpa.customMetrics [] Custom metrics contains the specifications for which to use to calculate the desired replica count (overrides the default use of Average CPU Utilization configured in targetAverageUtilization )
hpa.cpu.targetType AverageValue Set the autoscaling CPU target type, must be either Utilization or AverageValue
hpa.cpu.targetAverageValue 100m Set the autoscaling CPU target value
hpa.cpu.targetAverageUtilization Set the autoscaling CPU target utilization
hpa.memory.targetType Set the autoscaling memory target type, must be either Utilization or AverageValue
hpa.memory.targetAverageValue Set the autoscaling memory target value
hpa.memory.targetAverageUtilization Set the autoscaling memory target utilization
hpa.targetAverageValue
DEPRECATED Set the autoscaling CPU target value
image.pullPolicy IfNotPresent Shell image pull policy
image.pullSecrets Secrets for the image repository
image.repository registry.com/gitlab-org/build/cng/gitlab-shell Shell image repository
image.tag master Shell image tag
init.image.repository initContainer image
init.image.tag initContainer image tag
logging.format text Set to json for JSON-structured logs
logging.sshdLogLevel ERROR Log level for underlying SSH daemon
priorityClassName
Priority class assigned to pods.
replicaCount 1 Shell replicas
serviceLabels {} Supplemental service labels
service.externalTrafficPolicy Cluster Shell service external traffic policy (Cluster or Local)
service.internalPort 2222 Shell internal port
service.nodePort Sets shell nodePort if set
service.name gitlab-shell Shell service name
service.type ClusterIP Shell service type
service.loadBalancerIP IP address to assign to LoadBalancer (if supported)
service.loadBalancerSourceRanges List of IP CIDRs allowed access to LoadBalancer (if supported)
securityContext.fsGroup 1000 Group ID under which the pod should be started
securityContext.runAsUser 1000 User ID under which the pod should be started
sshDaemon openssh Selects which SSH daemon would be run, possible values ( openssh , gitlab-sshd )
tolerations [] Toleration labels for pod assignment
workhorse.serviceName webservice Workhorse service name (by default, Workhorse is a part of the webservice Pods / Service)
metrics.enabled false If a metrics endpoint should be made available for scraping
metrics.port 9122 Metrics endpoint port
metrics.path /metrics Metrics endpoint path
metrics.serviceMonitor.enabled false If a ServiceMonitor should be created to enable Prometheus Operator to manage the metrics scraping, note that enabling this removes the prometheus.io scrape annotations
metrics.serviceMonitor.additionalLabels {} Additional labels to add to the ServiceMonitor
metrics.serviceMonitor.endpointConfig {} Additional endpoint configuration for the ServiceMonitor
metrics.annotations
DEPRECATED Set explicit metrics annotations. Replaced by template content.

Chart configuration examples

extraEnv

extraEnv allows you to expose additional environment variables in all containers in the pods.

Below is an example use of extraEnv :

extraEnv:
SOME_KEY: some_value
SOME_OTHER_KEY: some_other_value

When the container is started, you can confirm that the environment variables are exposed:

env | grep SOME
SOME_KEY=some_value
SOME_OTHER_KEY=some_other_value

extraEnvFrom

extraEnvFrom allows you to expose additional environment variables from other data sources in all containers in the pods.

Below is an example use of extraEnvFrom :

extraEnvFrom:
MY_NODE_NAME:
fieldRef:
fieldPath: spec.nodeName
MY_CPU_REQUEST:
resourceFieldRef:
containerName: test-container
resource: requests.cpu
SECRET_THING:
secretKeyRef:
name: special-secret
key: special_token
# optional: boolean
CONFIG_STRING:
configMapKeyRef:
name: useful-config
key: some-string
# optional: boolean

image.pullSecrets

pullSecrets allows you to authenticate to a private registry to pull images for a pod.

Additional details about private registries and their authentication methods can be
found in the Kubernetes documentation.

Below is an example use of pullSecrets :

image:
repository: my.shell.repository
tag: latest
pullPolicy: Always
pullSecrets:
- name: my-secret-name
- name: my-secondary-secret-name

livenessProbe/readinessProbe

deployment.livenessProbe and deployment.readinessProbe provide a mechanism
to help control the termination of Pods under some scenarios.

Larger repositories benefit from tuning liveness and readiness probe
times to match their typical long-running connections. Set readiness
probe duration shorter than liveness probe duration to minimize
potential interruptions during clone and push operations. Increase
terminationGracePeriodSeconds and give these operations more time before
the scheduler terminates the pod. Consider the example below as a starting
point to tune GitLab Shell pods for increased stability and efficiency
with larger repository workloads.

deployment:
livenessProbe:
initialDelaySeconds: 10
periodSeconds: 20
timeoutSeconds: 3
successThreshold: 1
failureThreshold: 10
readinessProbe:
initialDelaySeconds: 10
periodSeconds: 5
timeoutSeconds: 2
successThreshold: 1
failureThreshold: 3
terminationGracePeriodSeconds: 300

Reference the official Kubernetes Documentation
for additional details regarding this configuration.

tolerations

tolerations allow you schedule pods on tainted worker nodes

Below is an example use of tolerations :

tolerations:
- key: "node_label"
operator: "Equal"
value: "true"
effect: "NoSchedule"
- key: "node_label"
operator: "Equal"
value: "true"
effect: "NoExecute"

annotations

annotations allows you to add annotations to the GitLab Shell pods.

Below is an example use of annotations

annotations:
kubernetes.io/example-annotation: annotation-value

External Services

This chart should be attached the Workhorse service.

Workhorse

workhorse:
host: workhorse.example.com
serviceName: webservice
port: 8181







Name Type Default Description
host String The hostname of the Workhorse server. This can be omitted in lieu of serviceName .
port Integer 8181 The port on which to connect to the Workhorse server.
serviceName String webservice The name of the service which is operating the Workhorse server. By default, Workhorse is a part of the webservice Pods / Service. If this is present, and host is not, the chart will template the hostname of the service (and current .Release.Name ) in place of the host value. This is convenient when using Workhorse as a part of the overall GitLab chart.

Chart settings

The following values are used to configure the GitLab Shell Pods.

hostKeys.secret

The name of the Kubernetes secret to grab the SSH host keys from. The keys in the
secret must start with the key names ssh_host_ in order to be used by GitLab Shell.

authToken

GitLab Shell uses an Auth Token in its communication with Workhorse. Share the token
with GitLab Shell and Workhorse using a shared Secret.

authToken:
secret: gitlab-shell-secret
key: secret






Name Type Default Description
authToken.key String The name of the key in the above secret that contains the auth token.
authToken.secret String The name of the Kubernetes Secret to pull from.

LoadBalancer Service

If the service.type is set to LoadBalancer , you can optionally specify service.loadBalancerIP to create
the LoadBalancer with a user-specified IP (if your cloud provider supports it).

You can also optionally specify a list of service.loadBalancerSourceRanges to restrict
the CIDR ranges that can access the LoadBalancer (if your cloud provider supports it).

Additional information about the LoadBalancer service type can be found in
the Kubernetes documentation

service:
type: LoadBalancer
loadBalancerIP: 1.2.3.4
loadBalancerSourceRanges:
- 5.6.7.8/32
- 10.0.0.0/8

Configuring the networkpolicy

This section controls the
NetworkPolicy.
This configuration is optional and is used to limit Egress and Ingress of the
Pods to specific endpoints.










Name Type Default Description
enabled Boolean false This setting enables the NetworkPolicy
ingress.enabled Boolean false When set to true , the Ingress network policy will be activated. This will block all Ingress connections unless rules are specified.
ingress.rules Array [] Rules for the Ingress policy, for details see https://kubernetes.io/docs/concepts/services-networking/network-policies/#the-networkpolicy-resource and the example below
egress.enabled Boolean false When set to true , the Egress network policy will be activated. This will block all egress connections unless rules are specified.
egress.rules Array [] Rules for the egress policy, these for details see https://kubernetes.io/docs/concepts/services-networking/network-policies/#the-networkpolicy-resource and the example below

Example Network Policy

The gitlab-shell service requires Ingress connections for port 22 and Egress
connections to various to default workhorse port 8181. This examples adds the
following network policy:


  • All Ingress requests from the network on TCP 0.0.0.0/0 port 2222 are allowed
  • All Egress requests to the network on UDP 10.0.0.0/8 port 53 are allowed for DNS
  • All Egress requests to the network on TCP 10.0.0.0/8 port 8181 are allowed for Workhorse
  • All Egress requests to the network on TCP 10.0.0.0/8 port 8075 are allowed for Gitaly

Note the example provided is only an example and may not be complete

networkpolicy:
enabled: true
ingress:
enabled: true
rules:
- from:
- ipBlock:
cidr: 0.0.0.0/0
ports:
- port: 2222
protocol: TCP
egress:
enabled: true
rules:
- to:
- ipBlock:
cidr: 10.0.0.0/8
ports:
- port: 8181
protocol: TCP
- port: 8075
protocol: TCP
- port: 53
protocol: UDP
Read article
GitLab Helm subcharts | GitLab




GitLab Helm subcharts

The GitLab Helm chart is made up of multiple subcharts,
which provide the core GitLab components:


  • Gitaly
  • GitLab Exporter
  • GitLab Grafana
  • GitLab Pages
  • GitLab Runner
  • GitLab Shell
  • GitLab agent server (KAS)
  • Mailroom
  • Migrations
  • Praefect
  • Sidekiq
  • Spamcheck
  • Toolbox
  • Webservice

The parameters for each subchart must be under the gitlab key. For example,
GitLab Shell parameters would be similar to:

gitlab:
gitlab-shell:
...

Use these charts for optional dependencies:


  • MinIO
  • NGINX
  • PostgreSQL
  • Redis
  • Registry

Use these charts as optional additions:


  • Prometheus
  • Grafana

  • Unprivileged GitLab Runner that uses the Kubernetes executor
  • Automatically provisioned SSL from Let’s Encrypt, which uses Jetstack’s cert-manager with certmanager-issuer
Read article
Using the GitLab `kas` chart | GitLab






  • Disable the agent server

    • Specify an Ingress
    • Installation command line options

  • Enable TLS communication

    • Create your certificates
    • Chart configuration values
  • Test the kas chart

Using the GitLab kas chart

The kas sub-chart provides a configurable deployment of the
GitLab agent server (KAS).
The agent server is a component you install together with GitLab. It is required to
manage the GitLab agent for Kubernetes.

This chart depends on access to the GitLab API and the Gitaly Servers.
When you enable this chart, an Ingress is deployed.

To consume minimal resources, the kas container uses a distroless image.
The deployed services are exposed by an Ingress, which uses
WebSocket proxying for communication.
This proxy allows long-lived connections with the external component,
agentk .
agentk is the Kubernetes cluster-side agent counterpart.

The route to access the service depends on your Ingress configuration.

For more information, see the
GitLab agent for Kubernetes architecture.

Disable the agent server

The GitLab agent server ( kas ) is enabled by default.
To disable it on your GitLab instance, set the Helm property global.kas.enabled to false .

For example:

helm upgrade --install kas --set global.kas.enabled=false

Specify an Ingress

When you use the chart’s Ingress with the default configuration,
the service for the agent server is reachable on a subdomain.
For example, for global.hosts.domain: example.com , the agent server
is reachable at kas.example.com .

The KAS Ingress
can use a different domain than the global.hosts.domain .

Set global.hosts.kas.name , for example:

global.hosts.kas.name: kas.my-other-domain.com

This example uses kas.my-other-domain.com as the host for the KAS Ingress alone.
The rest of the services (including GitLab, Registry, MinIO, etc.) use the domain
specified in global.hosts.domain .

Installation command line options

You can pass these parameters to the helm install command by using the --set flags.

































































Parameter Default Description
annotations {} Pod annotations.
common.labels {} Supplemental labels that are applied to all objects created by this chart.
extraContainers List of extra containers to include.
image.repository registry.gitlab.com/gitlab-org/build/cng/gitlab-kas Image repository.
image.tag v13.7.0 Image tag.
hpa.behavior {scaleDown: {stabilizationWindowSeconds: 300 }} Behavior contains the specifications for up- and downscaling behavior (requires autoscaling/v2beta2 or higher)
hpa.customMetrics [] Custom metrics contains the specifications for which to use to calculate the desired replica count (overrides the default use of Average CPU Utilization configured in targetAverageUtilization )
hpa.cpu.targetType AverageValue Set the autoscaling CPU target type, must be either Utilization or AverageValue
hpa.cpu.targetAverageValue 100m Set the autoscaling CPU target value
hpa.cpu.targetAverageUtilization Set the autoscaling CPU target utilization
hpa.memory.targetType Set the autoscaling memory target type, must be either Utilization or AverageValue
hpa.memory.targetAverageValue Set the autoscaling memory target value
hpa.memory.targetAverageUtilization Set the autoscaling memory target utilization
hpa.targetAverageValue
DEPRECATED Set the autoscaling CPU target value
ingress.enabled
true if global.kas.enabled=true
You can use kas.ingress.enabled to explicitly turn it on or off. If not set, you can optionally use global.ingress.enabled for the same purpose.
ingress.apiVersion Value to use in the apiVersion field.
ingress.annotations {} Ingress annotations.
ingress.tls {} Ingress TLS configuration.
ingress.agentPath / Ingress path for the agent API endpoint.
ingress.k8sApiPath /k8s-proxy Ingress path for Kubernetes API endpoint.
metrics.enabled true If a metrics endpoint should be made available for scraping.
metrics.port 8151
DEPRECATED: use observability.port . Metrics endpoint port.
metrics.path /metrics Metrics endpoint path.
metrics.serviceMonitor.enabled false If a ServiceMonitor should be created to enable Prometheus Operator to manage the metrics scraping. Enabling removes the prometheus.io scrape annotations.
metrics.serviceMonitor.additionalLabels {} Additional labels to add to the ServiceMonitor.
metrics.serviceMonitor.endpointConfig {} Additional endpoint configuration for the ServiceMonitor.
maxReplicas 10 HPA maxReplicas .
maxUnavailable 1 HPA maxUnavailable .
minReplicas 2 HPA maxReplicas .
nodeSelector Define a nodeSelector for the Pod s of this Deployment , if present.
observability.port 8151 Observability endpoint port. Used for metrics and probe endpoints.
observability.livenessProbe.path /liveness URI for the liveness probe endpoint. This value has to match the observability.liveness_probe.url_path value from the KAS service configuration
observability.readinessProbe.path /readiness URI for the readiness probe endpoint. This value has to match the observability.readiness_probe.url_path value from the KAS service configuration
serviceAccount.annotations {} Service account annotations.
podLabels {} Supplemental Pod labels. Not used for selectors.
serviceLabels {} Supplemental service labels.
common.labels Supplemental labels that are applied to all objects created by this chart.
redis.enabled true Allows opting-out of using Redis for KAS features. Warnings: Redis will become a hard dependency soon, so this key is already deprecated.
resources.requests.cpu 75m GitLab Exporter minimum CPU.
resources.requests.memory 100M GitLab Exporter minimum memory.
service.externalPort 8150 External port (for agentk connections).
service.internalPort 8150 Internal port (for agentk connections).
service.apiInternalPort 8153 Internal port for the internal API (for GitLab backend).
service.loadBalancerIP nil A custom load balancer IP when service.type is LoadBalancer .
service.loadBalancerSourceRanges nil A list of custom load balancer source ranges when service.type is LoadBalancer .
service.kubernetesApiPort 8154 External port to expose proxied Kubernetes API on.
service.privateApiPort 8155 Internal port to expose kas ’ private API on (for kas -> kas communication).
privateApi.secret Autogenerated The name of the secret to use for authenticating with the database.
privateApi.key Autogenerated The name of the key in privateApi.secret to use.
privateApi.tls false Enable kas pods to communicate with each other using TLS.
privateApi.tls.secretName nil Name of the Kubernetes TLS secret which contains the certificate and its associated key. Required if privateApi.tls is true .
privateApi.host private-api.test Name of the host added to your certificate’s SAN. Required if privateApi.tls is true .
global.kas.service.apiExternalPort 8153 External port for the internal API (for GitLab backend).
service.type ClusterIP Service type.
tolerations [] Toleration labels for pod assignment.
customConfig {} When given, merges the default kas configuration with these values giving precedence to those defined here.
deployment.minReadySeconds 0 Minimum number of seconds that must pass before a kas pod is considered ready.
deployment.strategy {} Allows one to configure the update strategy utilized by the deployment.
deployment.terminationGracePeriodSeconds 300 How much time in seconds a Pod is allowed to spend shutting down after receiving SIGTERM.
priorityClassName
Priority class assigned to pods.

Enable TLS communication

Enable TLS communication between your kas pods and other GitLab chart components.

Prerequisite:


  • You need at least GitLab 15.5.1 to use this feature. You can set your GitLab version with global.gitlabVersion: master . If you need to force an image update after an initial deployment, also set global.image.pullPolicy: Always .

  1. Create the certificate authority and certificates that your kas pods will trust.
  2. Configure your chart to use the trusted certificates.

Create your certificates

To create a certificate authority (CA) and the required certificates, follow the steps in
Use TLS between components of the GitLab chart.

Chart configuration values

To configure kas to use the certificates you created, set the following values.











Value Description
global.certificates.customCAs Shares your CA with your GitLab components.
global.appConfig.gitlab_kas.internalUrl Enables grpcs communication between the GitLab Webservice and kas .
gitlab.kas.privateApi.tls.enabled Mounts the certificates volume and enables TLS communication between kas pods.
gitlab.kas.privateApi.tls.secretName Specifies which Kubernetes TLS secret stores your certificates.
gitlab.kas.customConfig Configures kas to expose its ports by using grpcs .
gitlab.kas.ingress Configures kas Ingress to verify the proxied SSL certificate.

For example, you could use this values.yaml file to deploy your chart:

   .internal-ca: &internal-ca gitlab-internal-tls-ca # The secret name you used to share your TLS CA.
.internal-tls: &internal-tls gitlab-internal-tls # The secret name you used to share your TLS certificate.

global:
certificates:
customCAs:
- secret: *internal-ca
hosts:
domain: gitlab.example.com # Your gitlab domain
appConfig:
gitlab_kas:
internalUrl: "grpcs://RELEASE-kas.NAMESPACE.svc:8153" # Replace RELEASE and NAMESPACE with your chart's release and namespace

gitlab:
kas:
privateApi:
tls:
enabled: true
secretName: *internal-tls
customConfig:
api:
listen:
certificate_file: /etc/kas/tls.crt
key_file: /etc/kas/tls.key
agent:
listen:
certificate_file: /etc/kas/tls.crt
key_file: /etc/kas/tls.key
kubernetes_api:
listen:
certificate_file: /etc/kas/tls.crt
key_file: /etc/kas/tls.key
ingress:
annotations:
nginx.ingress.kubernetes.io/backend-protocol: https
nginx.ingress.kubernetes.io/proxy-ssl-name: RELEASE-kas.NAMESPACE.svc # Replace RELEASE and NAMESPACE with your chart's release and namespace
nginx.ingress.kubernetes.io/proxy-ssl-secret: NAMESPACE/CA-SECRET-NAME # Replace NAMESPACE and CA-SECRET-NAME with your chart's namespace and CA secret name. The same you used for &internal-ca.
nginx.ingress.kubernetes.io/proxy-ssl-verify: on

Test the kas chart

To install the chart:


  1. Create your own Kubernetes cluster.
  2. Check out the merge request’s working branch.

  3. Install (or upgrade) GitLab with kas enabled by default from your local chart branch:


    helm upgrade --force --install gitlab . \
    --timeout 600s \
    --set global.hosts.domain=your.domain.com \
    --set global.hosts.externalIP=XYZ.XYZ.XYZ.XYZ \
    --set certmanager-issuer.email=your@email.com

  4. Use the GDK to run the process to configure and use the
    GitLab agent for Kubernetes:
    (You can also follow the steps to configure and use the agent manually.)


    1. From your GDK GitLab repository, move into the QA folder: cd qa .

    2. Run the following command to run the QA test:


      GITLAB_USERNAME=$ROOT_USER
      GITLAB_PASSWORD=$ROOT_PASSWORD
      GITLAB_ADMIN_USERNAME=$ROOT_USER
      GITLAB_ADMIN_PASSWORD=$ROOT_PASSWORD
      bundle exec bin/qa Test::Instance::All https://your.gitlab.domain/ -- --tag orchestrated --tag quarantine qa/specs/features/ee/api/7_configure/kubernetes/kubernetes_agent_spec.rb

      You can also customize the agentk version to install with an environment variable: GITLAB_AGENTK_VERSION=v13.7.1

Read article
Using the Mailroom chart | GitLab





  • Configuration

  • Incoming email

    • IMAP
    • Microsoft Graph
    • Reply-by-email

    • Service Desk email

      • IMAP
      • Microsoft Graph

Using the Mailroom chart

The Mailroom Pod handles the ingestion of email into the GitLab application.

Configuration

image:
repository: registry.gitlab.com/gitlab-org/build/cng/gitlab-mailroom
# tag: v0.9.1
pullSecrets: []
# pullPolicy: IfNotPresent

enabled: true

init:
image: {}
# repository:
# tag:
resources:
requests:
cpu: 50m

# Tolerations for pod scheduling
tolerations: []

podLabels: {}

hpa:
minReplicas: 1
maxReplicas: 2
cpu:
targetAverageUtilization: 75

# Note that the HPA is limited to autoscaling/v2beta1, autoscaling/v2beta2 and autoscaling/v2
customMetrics: []
behavior: {}

networkpolicy:
enabled: false
egress:
enabled: false
rules: []
ingress:
enabled: false
rules: []
annotations: {}

resources:
# limits:
# cpu: 1
# memory: 2G
requests:
cpu: 50m
memory: 150M

## Allow to overwrite under which User and Group we're running.
securityContext:
runAsUser: 1000
fsGroup: 1000

## Enable deployment to use a serviceAccount
serviceAccount:
enabled: false
create: false
annotations: {}
## Name to be used for serviceAccount, otherwise defaults to chart fullname
# name:









































Parameter Description Default
deployment.strategy Allows one to configure the update strategy utilized by the deployment {}
enabled Mailroom enablement flag true
hpa.behavior Behavior contains the specifications for up- and downscaling behavior (requires autoscaling/v2beta2 or higher) {scaleDown: {stabilizationWindowSeconds: 300 }}
hpa.customMetrics Custom metrics contains the specifications for which to use to calculate the desired replica count (overrides the default use of Average CPU Utilization configured in targetAverageUtilization ) []
hpa.cpu.targetType Set the autoscaling CPU target type, must be either Utilization or AverageValue
Utilization
hpa.cpu.targetAverageValue Set the autoscaling CPU target value
hpa.cpu.targetAverageUtilization Set the autoscaling CPU target utilization 75
hpa.memory.targetType Set the autoscaling memory target type, must be either Utilization or AverageValue
hpa.memory.targetAverageValue Set the autoscaling memory target value
hpa.memory.targetAverageUtilization Set the autoscaling memory target utilization
hpa.maxReplicas Maximum number of replicas 2
hpa.minReplicas Minimum number of replicas 1
image.pullPolicy Mailroom image pull policy IfNotPresent
extraEnvFrom List of extra environment variables from other data sources to expose
image.pullSecrets Mailroom image pull secrets
image.repository Mailroom image repository registry.gitlab.com/gitlab-org/build/cng/gitlab-mailroom
image.tag Mailroom image tag master
init.image.repository Mailroom init image repository
init.image.tag Mailroom init image tag
init.resources Mailroom init container resource requirements { requests: { cpu: 50m }}
podLabels Labels for running Mailroom Pods {}
common.labels Supplemental labels that are applied to all objects created by this chart. {}
resources Mailroom resource requirements { requests: { cpu: 50m, memory: 150M }}
networkpolicy.annotations Annotations to add to the NetworkPolicy {}
networkpolicy.egress.enabled Flag to enable egress rules of NetworkPolicy false
networkpolicy.egress.rules Define a list of egress rules for NetworkPolicy []
networkpolicy.enabled Flag for using NetworkPolicy false
networkpolicy.ingress.enabled Flag to enable ingress rules of NetworkPolicy false
networkpolicy.ingress.rules Define a list of ingress rules for NetworkPolicy []
securityContext.fsGroup Group ID under which the pod should be started 1000
securityContext.runAsUser User ID under which the pod should be started 1000
serviceAccount.annotations Annotations for ServiceAccount {}
serviceAccount.enabled Flag for using ServiceAccount false
serviceAccount.create Flag for creating a ServiceAccount false
serviceAccount.name Name of ServiceAccount to use
tolerations Tolerations to add to the Mailroom
priorityClassName
Priority class assigned to pods.

Incoming email

By default, incoming email is disabled. There are two methods for
reading incoming email:


  • IMAP
  • Microsoft Graph

First, enable it by setting the common settings.
Then configure the IMAP settings or
Microsoft Graph settings.

These methods can be configured in values.yaml . See the following examples:


  • Incoming email with IMAP
  • Incoming email with Microsoft Graph

IMAP

To enable incoming e-mail for IMAP, provide details of your IMAP server
and access credentials using the global.appConfig.incomingEmail
settings.

In addition, the requirements for the IMAP email account
should be reviewed to ensure that the targeted IMAP account can be used
by GitLab for receiving email. Several common email services are also
documented on the same page to aid in setting up incoming email.

The IMAP password will still need to be created as a Kubernetes Secret as
described in the secrets guide.

Microsoft Graph

See the GitLab documentation on creating an Azure Active Directory application.

Provide the tenant ID, client ID, and client secret. You can find details for these settings in the command line options.

Create a Kubernetes secret containing the client secret as described in the secrets guide.

Reply-by-email

To use the reply-by-email feature, where users can reply to notification emails to
comment on issues and MRs, you need to configure both outgoing email
and incoming email settings.

Service Desk email

By default, the Service Desk email is disabled.

As with incoming e-mail, enable it by setting the common settings.
Then configure the IMAP settings or
Microsoft Graph settings.

These options can also be configured in values.yaml . See the following examples:


  • Service Desk with IMAP
  • Service Desk with Microsoft Graph

Service Desk email requires that Incoming email be configured.

IMAP

Provide details of your IMAP server and access credentials using the
global.appConfig.serviceDeskEmail settings. You can find details for
these settings in the command line options.

Create a Kubernetes secret containing IMAP password as described in the secrets guide.

Microsoft Graph

See the GitLab documentation on creating an Azure Active Directory application.

Provide the tenant ID, client ID, and client secret using the
global.appConfig.serviceDeskEmail settings. You can find details for
these settings in the command line options.

You will also have to create a Kubernetes secret containing the client secret
as described in the secrets guide.

Read article
Using the GitLab-Migrations chart | GitLab





  • Requirements
  • Design Choices
  • Configuration
  • Installation command line options

  • Chart configuration examples

    • extraEnv
    • extraEnvFrom
    • image.pullSecrets
  • Using the Community Edition of this chart

  • External Services


    • Redis

      • host
      • serviceName
      • port
      • password
      • sentinels

    • PostgreSQL

      • host
      • serviceName
      • port
      • database
      • preparedStatements
      • username
      • password

Using the GitLab-Migrations chart

The migrations sub-chart provides a single migration Job that handles seeding/migrating the GitLab database. The chart runs using the GitLab Rails codebase.

After migrating, this Job also edits the application settings in the database to turn off writes to authorized keys file. In the charts we are only supporting use of the GitLab Authorized Keys API with the SSH AuthorizedKeysCommand instead of support for writing to an authorized keys file.

Requirements

This chart depends on Redis, and PostgreSQL, either as part of the complete GitLab chart or provided as external services reachable from the Kubernetes cluster this chart is deployed onto.

Design Choices

The migrations creates a new migrations Job each time the chart is deployed. In order to prevent job name collisions, we append the chart revision, and a random alpha-numeric value to the Job name each time is created. The purpose of the random text is described further in this section.

For now we also have the jobs remain as objects in the cluster after they complete. This is so we can observe the migration logs. Currently this means these Jobs persist even after a helm uninstall . This is one of the reasons why we append random text to the Job name, so that future deployments using the same release name don’t cause conflicts. Once we have some form of log-shipping in place, we can revisit the persistence of these objects.

The container used in this chart has some additional optimizations that we are not currently using in this Chart. Mainly the ability to quickly skip running migrations if they are already up to date, without needing to boot up the rails application to check. This optimization requires us to persist the migration status. Which we are not doing with this chart at the moment. In the future we will introduce storage support for the migrations status to this chart.

Configuration

The migrations chart is configured in two parts: external services, and chart settings.

Installation command line options

Table below contains all the possible charts configurations that can be supplied to helm install command using the --set flags


































Parameter Description Default
common.labels Supplemental labels that are applied to all objects created by this chart. {}
image.repository Migrations image repository registry.gitlab.com/gitlab-org/build/cng/gitlab-toolbox-ee
image.tag Migrations image tag
image.pullPolicy Migrations pull policy Always
image.pullSecrets Secrets for the image repository
init.image initContainer image busybox
init.tag initContainer image tag latest
enabled Migrations enable flag true
tolerations Toleration labels for pod assignment []
annotations Annotations for the job spec {}
podAnnotations Annotations for the pob spec {}
podLabels Supplemental Pod labels. Will not be used for selectors.
redis.serviceName Redis service name redis
psql.serviceName Name of Service providing PostgreSQL release-postgresql
psql.password.secret psql secret gitlab-postgres
psql.password.key key to psql password in psql secret psql-password
psql.port Set PostgreSQL server port. Takes precedence over global.psql.port
resources.requests.cpu 250m GitLab Migrations minimum CPU
resources.requests.memory 200Mi GitLab Migrations minimum memory
securityContext.fsGroup 1000 Group ID under which the pod should be started
securityContext.runAsUser 1000 User ID under which the pod should be started
extraInitContainers List of extra init containers to include
extraContainers List of extra containers to include
extraVolumes List of extra volumes to create
extraVolumeMounts List of extra volumes mounts to do
extraEnv List of extra environment variables to expose
extraEnvFrom List of extra environment variables from other data sources to expose
bootsnap.enabled Enable the Bootsnap cache for Rails true
priorityClassName
Priority class assigned to pods.

Chart configuration examples

extraEnv

extraEnv allows you to expose additional environment variables in all containers in the pods.

Below is an example use of extraEnv :

extraEnv:
SOME_KEY: some_value
SOME_OTHER_KEY: some_other_value

When the container is started, you can confirm that the environment variables are exposed:

env | grep SOME
SOME_KEY=some_value
SOME_OTHER_KEY=some_other_value

extraEnvFrom

extraEnvFrom allows you to expose additional environment variables from other data sources in all containers in the pods.

Below is an example use of extraEnvFrom :

extraEnvFrom:
MY_NODE_NAME:
fieldRef:
fieldPath: spec.nodeName
MY_CPU_REQUEST:
resourceFieldRef:
containerName: test-container
resource: requests.cpu
SECRET_THING:
secretKeyRef:
name: special-secret
key: special_token
# optional: boolean
CONFIG_STRING:
configMapKeyRef:
name: useful-config
key: some-string
# optional: boolean

image.pullSecrets

pullSecrets allow you to authenticate to a private registry to pull images for a pod.

Additional details about private registries and their authentication methods
can be found in the Kubernetes documentation.

Below is an example use of pullSecrets :

image:
repository: my.migrations.repository
pullPolicy: Always
pullSecrets:
- name: my-secret-name
- name: my-secondary-secret-name

Using the Community Edition of this chart

By default, the Helm charts use the Enterprise Edition of GitLab. If desired, you can instead use the Community Edition. Learn more about the difference between the two.

In order to use the Community Edition, set image.repository to registry.gitlab.com/gitlab-org/build/cng/gitlab-toolbox-ce

External Services

Redis

redis:
host: redis.example.com
serviceName: redis
port: 6379
sentinels:
- host: sentinel1.example.com
port: 26379
password:
secret: gitlab-redis
key: redis-password

host

The hostname of the Redis server with the database to use. This can be omitted in lieu of serviceName . If using Redis Sentinels, the host attribute needs to be set to the cluster name as specified in the sentinel.conf .

serviceName

The name of the service which is operating the Redis database. If this is present, and host is not, the chart will template the hostname of the service (and current .Release.Name ) in place of the host value. This is convenient when using Redis as a part of the overall GitLab chart. This will default to redis

port

The port on which to connect to the Redis server. Defaults to 6379 .

password

The password attribute for Redis has two sub keys:



  • secret defines the name of the Kubernetes Secret to pull from

  • key defines the name of the key in the above secret that contains the password.

sentinels

The sentinels attribute allows for a connection to a Redis HA cluster.
The sub keys describe each Sentinel connection.



  • host defines the hostname for the Sentinel service

  • port defines the port number to reach the Sentinel service, defaults to 26379

Note: The current Redis Sentinel support only supports Sentinels that have
been deployed separately from the GitLab chart. As a result, the Redis
deployment through the GitLab chart should be disabled with redis.install=false .
The Secret containing the Redis password will need to be manually created
before deploying the GitLab chart.

PostgreSQL

psql:
host: psql.example.com
serviceName: pgbouncer
port: 5432
database: gitlabhq_production
username: gitlab
preparedStatements: false
password:
secret: gitlab-postgres
key: psql-password

host

The hostname of the PostgreSQL server with the database to use. This can be omitted if postgresql.install=true (default non-production).

serviceName

The name of the service which is operating the PostgreSQL database. If this is present, and host is not, the chart will template the hostname of the service in place of the host value.

port

The port on which to connect to the PostgreSQL server. Defaults to 5432 .

database

The name of the database to use on the PostgreSQL server. This defaults to gitlabhq_production .

preparedStatements

If prepared statements should be used when communicating with the PostgreSQL server. Defaults to false .

username

The username with which to authenticate to the database. This defaults to gitlab

password

The password attribute for PostgreSQL has to sub keys:



  • secret defines the name of the Kubernetes Secret to pull from

  • key defines the name of the key in the above secret that contains the password.
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