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Other Systems

Other Systems

Table of Contents
  • FreeBSD
    • Long Term Support release
    • Weekly release
    • Start Jenkins
    • Enable Jenkins
  • OpenIndiana Hipster
  • Solaris, OmniOS, SmartOS, and other siblings
  • Post-installation setup wizard
    • Unlocking Jenkins
    • Customizing Jenkins with plugins
    • Creating the first administrator user

FreeBSD

Jenkins can be installed on FreeBSD using the standard FreeBSD package manager, pkg .

Long Term Support release

A LTS (Long-Term Support) release is chosen every 12 weeks from the stream of regular releases as the stable release for that time period. It can be installed from the FreeBSD pkg package manager.

# pkg install jenkins-lts

Disclaimer: The FreeBSD project maintains the Jenkins packaging for FreeBSD. The Jenkins package for FreeBSD is NOT officially supported by the Jenkins project, but it is actively used by the FreeBSD project at ci.freebsd.org/ .

Weekly release

A new release is produced weekly to deliver bug fixes and features to users and plugin developers. It can be installed from the FreeBSD pkg package manager.

# pkg install jenkins

The long term support package jenkins-lts and the weekly package installation jenkins will:

  • Configure Jenkins as a daemon which may optionally be launched on start. See /etc/rc.conf for more details

  • Create a ‘jenkins’ user to run the service

  • Direct console log output to the file /var/log/jenkins.log . Check this file when troubleshooting Jenkins

  • Set Jenkins to listen on port 8180 from the path /jenkins . Open http://localhost:8180/jenkins to login to Jenkins

Start Jenkins

You can start the Jenkins service with the command:

# service jenkins onestart

You can check the status of the Jenkins service using the command:

# service jenkins status

You can stop the Jenkins service with the command:

# service jenkins stop

Enable Jenkins

Add the following to /etc/rc.conf to start Jenkins automatically on system boot:

jenkins_enable="YES"

Once Jenkins is enabled, it can be started with:

# service jenkins start

Other configuration values that can be set in /etc/rc.conf or in /etc/rc.conf.d/jenkins are described in /usr/local/etc/rc.d/jenkins . Refer to the Jenkins page on the FreeBSD wiki for more information specific to Jenkins on FreeBSD.

OpenIndiana Hipster

On a system running OpenIndiana Hipster Jenkins can be installed in either the local or global zone using the Image Packaging System (IPS).

Disclaimer: This platform is NOT officially supported by the Jenkins team, use it at your own risk. Packaging and integration described in this section is maintained by the OpenIndiana Hipster team, bundling the generic jenkins.war to work in that operating environment.

For the common case of running the newest packaged weekly build as a standalone (Jetty) server, simply execute:

pkg install jenkins
svcadm enable jenkins

The common packaging integration for a standalone service will:

  • Create a jenkins user to run the service and to own the directory structures under /var/lib/jenkins .

  • Pull the Java package and other packages required to execute Jenkins, including the jenkins-core-weekly package with the latest jenkins.war .

  • Set up Jenkins as an SMF service instance ( svc:/network/http:jenkins ) which can then be enabled with the svcadm command demonstrated above.

  • Set up Jenkins to listen on port 8080.

  • Configure the log output to be managed by SMF at /var/svc/log/network-http:jenkins.log .

Once Jenkins is running, consult the log ( /var/svc/log/network-http:jenkins.log ) to retrieve the generated administrator password for the initial set up of Jenkins, usually it will be found at /var/lib/jenkins/home/secrets/initialAdminPassword . Then navigate to localhost:8080 to complete configuration of the Jenkins instance .

To change attributes of the service, such as environment variables like JENKINS_HOME or the port number used for the Jetty web server, use the svccfg utility:

svccfg -s svc:/network/http:jenkins editprop
svcadm refresh svc:/network/http:jenkins

You can also refer to /lib/svc/manifest/network/jenkins-standalone.xml for more details and comments about currently supported tunables of the SMF service. Note that the jenkins user account created by the packaging is specially privileged to allow binding to port numbers under 1024.

The current status of Jenkins-related packages available for the given release of OpenIndiana can be queried with:

pkg info -r '*jenkins*'

Upgrades to the package can be performed by updating the entire operating environment with pkg update , or specifically for Jenkins core software with:

pkg update jenkins-core-weekly

Procedure for updating the package will restart the currently running Jenkins process. Make sure to prepare it for shutdown and finish all running jobs before updating, if needed.

Solaris, OmniOS, SmartOS, and other siblings

Generally it should suffice to install a supported Java version, download the jenkins.war , and run it as a standalone process.

Some caveats apply:

  • Headless JVM and fonts: For OpenJDK builds on minimalized-footprint systems, there may be issues running the headless JVM , because Jenkins needs some fonts to render certain pages.

Post-installation setup wizard

After downloading, installing and running Jenkins using one of the procedures above (except for installation with Jenkins Operator), the post-installation setup wizard begins.

This setup wizard takes you through a few quick "one-off" steps to unlock Jenkins, customize it with plugins and create the first administrator user through which you can continue accessing Jenkins.

Unlocking Jenkins

When you first access a new Jenkins instance, you are asked to unlock it using an automatically-generated password.

  1. Browse to http://localhost:8080 (or whichever port you configured for Jenkins when installing it) and wait until the Unlock Jenkins page appears.

    Unlock Jenkins page

  2. From the Jenkins console log output, copy the automatically-generated alphanumeric password (between the 2 sets of asterisks).

    Copying initial admin password
    Note:

    • The command: sudo cat /var/lib/jenkins/secrets/initialAdminPassword will print the password at console.

    • If you are running Jenkins in Docker using the official jenkins/jenkins image you can use sudo docker exec ${CONTAINER_ID or CONTAINER_NAME} cat /var/jenkins_home/secrets/initialAdminPassword to print the password in the console without having to exec into the container.

  3. On the Unlock Jenkins page, paste this password into the Administrator password field and click Continue .
    Notes:

    • You can always access the Jenkins console log from the Docker logs (above).

    • The Jenkins console log indicates the location (in the Jenkins home directory) where this password can also be obtained. This password must be entered in the setup wizard on new Jenkins installations before you can access Jenkins’s main UI. This password also serves as the default administrator account’s password (with username "admin") if you happen to skip the subsequent user-creation step in the setup wizard.

Customizing Jenkins with plugins

After unlocking Jenkins, the Customize Jenkins page appears. Here you can install any number of useful plugins as part of your initial setup.

Click one of the two options shown:

  • Install suggested plugins - to install the recommended set of plugins, which are based on most common use cases.

  • Select plugins to install - to choose which set of plugins to initially install. When you first access the plugin selection page, the suggested plugins are selected by default.

If you are not sure what plugins you need, choose Install suggested plugins . You can install (or remove) additional Jenkins plugins at a later point in time via the Manage Jenkins > Manage Plugins page in Jenkins.

The setup wizard shows the progression of Jenkins being configured and your chosen set of Jenkins plugins being installed. This process may take a few minutes.

Creating the first administrator user

Finally, after customizing Jenkins with plugins , Jenkins asks you to create your first administrator user.

  1. When the Create First Admin User page appears, specify the details for your administrator user in the respective fields and click Save and Finish .

  2. When the Jenkins is ready page appears, click Start using Jenkins .
    Notes:

    • This page may indicate Jenkins is almost ready! instead and if so, click Restart .

    • If the page does not automatically refresh after a minute, use your web browser to refresh the page manually.

  3. If required, log in to Jenkins with the credentials of the user you just created and you are ready to start using Jenkins!



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Other Servlet Containers

Other Servlet Containers

Table of Contents
  • Tomcat 9
  • WildFly 26

Jenkins is typically run as a standalone application in its own process. The Jenkins WAR file bundles Winstone, a Jetty servlet container wrapper, and can be started on any operating system or platform with a version of Java supported by Jenkins. This is the preferred way to deploy Jenkins and is fully supported.

Theoretically, Jenkins can also be run as a servlet in a traditional servlet container like Apache Tomcat or WildFly, but in practice this is largely untested and there are many caveats. In particular, support for WebSocket agents is only implemented for the Jetty servlet container. See the Servlet Container Support Policy page for details.

Support for traditional servlet containers may be discontinued in the future.

Jenkins requires Servlet API 4.0 (Jakarta EE 8) with javax.servlet imports. Jenkins is incompatible with Servlet API 5.0 (Jakarta EE 9) or later with jakarta.servlet imports. Ensure that the Servlet API version of your chosen servlet container is compatible before running Jenkins.

Tomcat 9

Tomcat 9 is based on Servlet API 4.0 (Jakarta EE 8), which is the version of the servlet API required by Jenkins.

Later versions of Tomcat use newer versions of the Servlet API and are incompatible with Jenkins.

Jenkins can be deployed to Tomcat by placing the Jenkins WAR file in the ${CATALINA_HOME}/webapps/ directory.

To configure the Jenkins home directory, set the JENKINS_HOME Java system property via the CATALINA_OPTS environment variable. For example, create ${CATALINA_HOME}/bin/setenv.sh with the following contents:

export CATALINA_OPTS=-DJENKINS_HOME=/var/lib/jenkins
Running multiple Jenkins controllers within a single Java process is unsupported.

Scheme selection in redirect URLs is delegated to the servlet container, and Jetty handles the X-Forwarded-For , X-Forwarded-By , and X-Forwarded-Proto headers by default. With Tomcat, one needs to add a Remote IP Valve to expose these headers to Jenkins via the Servlet API. Add the following to ${CATALINA_HOME}/conf/server.xml within the <Host> section:

<Valve className="org.apache.catalina.valves.RemoteIpValve"
       remoteIpHeader="X-Forwarded-For"
       proxiesHeader="X-Forwarded-By"
       protocolHeader="X-Forwarded-Proto" />

WildFly 26

WildFly 26 is based on Servlet API 4.0 (Jakarta EE 8), which is the version of the servlet API required by Jenkins.

Later versions of WildFly use newer versions of the Servlet API and are incompatible with Jenkins.

Jenkins can be deployed to WildFly by placing the Jenkins WAR file in the ${JBOSS_HOME}/standalone/deployments/ directory.

To configure the Jenkins home directory, set the JENKINS_HOME Java system property via the JAVA_OPTS environment variable. For example, update ${JBOSS_HOME}/bin/standalone.conf with the following contents:

JAVA_OPTS="$JAVA_OPTS -DJENKINS_HOME=/var/lib/jenkins"
Running multiple Jenkins controllers within a single Java process is unsupported.


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WAR file

WAR file

Table of Contents
  • Prerequisites
  • Run the WAR file
  • Post-installation setup wizard
    • Unlocking Jenkins
    • Customizing Jenkins with plugins
    • Creating the first administrator user

The Jenkins Web application ARchive (WAR) file bundles Winstone, a Jetty servlet container wrapper, and can be started on any operating system or platform with a version of Java supported by Jenkins. See the Java Requirements page for details.

Prerequisites

Minimum hardware requirements:

  • 256 MB of RAM

  • 1 GB of drive space (although 10 GB is a recommended minimum if running Jenkins as a Docker container)

Recommended hardware configuration for a small team:

  • 4 GB+ of RAM

  • 50 GB+ of drive space

Comprehensive hardware recommendations:

  • Hardware: see the Hardware Recommendations page

Software requirements:

  • Java: see the Java Requirements page

  • Web browser: see the Web Browser Compatibility page

  • For Windows operating system: Windows Support Policy

  • For Linux operating system: Linux Support Policy

  • For servlet containers: Servlet Container Support Policy

Run the WAR file

The Jenkins Web application ARchive (WAR) file can be started from the command line like this:

  1. Download the latest Jenkins WAR file to an appropriate directory on your machine

  2. Open up a terminal/command prompt window to the download directory

  3. Run the command java -jar jenkins.war

  4. Browse to http://localhost:8080 and wait until the Unlock Jenkins page appears

  5. Continue on with the Post-installation setup wizard below

Notes:

  • This process does not automatically install any specific plugins. They need to installed separately via the Manage Jenkins > Manage Plugins page in Jenkins.

  • You can change the port by specifying the --httpPort option when you run the java -jar jenkins.war command. For example, to make Jenkins accessible through port 9090, then run Jenkins using the command:
    java -jar jenkins.war --httpPort=9090

  • You can change the directory where Jenkins stores its configuration with the JENKINS_HOME environment variable. For example, to place the Jenkins configuration files in a subdirectory named my-jenkins-config , define JENKINS_HOME=my-jenkins-config before running the java -jar jenkins.war command. Use the Windows commands:

    Windows
    C:\Temp > set JENKINS_HOME=my-jenkins-config
    C:\Temp > java -jar jenkins.war

    or the Unix command:

    Unix
    $ JENKINS_HOME=my-jenkins-config java -jar jenkins.war

For more details of command line arguments that can adjust Jenkins startup, use the command:
java -jar jenkins.war --help

Post-installation setup wizard

After downloading, installing and running Jenkins using one of the procedures above (except for installation with Jenkins Operator), the post-installation setup wizard begins.

This setup wizard takes you through a few quick "one-off" steps to unlock Jenkins, customize it with plugins and create the first administrator user through which you can continue accessing Jenkins.

Unlocking Jenkins

When you first access a new Jenkins instance, you are asked to unlock it using an automatically-generated password.

  1. Browse to http://localhost:8080 (or whichever port you configured for Jenkins when installing it) and wait until the Unlock Jenkins page appears.

    Unlock Jenkins page

  2. From the Jenkins console log output, copy the automatically-generated alphanumeric password (between the 2 sets of asterisks).

    Copying initial admin password
    Note:

    • The command: sudo cat /var/lib/jenkins/secrets/initialAdminPassword will print the password at console.

    • If you are running Jenkins in Docker using the official jenkins/jenkins image you can use sudo docker exec ${CONTAINER_ID or CONTAINER_NAME} cat /var/jenkins_home/secrets/initialAdminPassword to print the password in the console without having to exec into the container.

  3. On the Unlock Jenkins page, paste this password into the Administrator password field and click Continue .
    Notes:

    • You can always access the Jenkins console log from the Docker logs (above).

    • The Jenkins console log indicates the location (in the Jenkins home directory) where this password can also be obtained. This password must be entered in the setup wizard on new Jenkins installations before you can access Jenkins’s main UI. This password also serves as the default administrator account’s password (with username "admin") if you happen to skip the subsequent user-creation step in the setup wizard.

Customizing Jenkins with plugins

After unlocking Jenkins, the Customize Jenkins page appears. Here you can install any number of useful plugins as part of your initial setup.

Click one of the two options shown:

  • Install suggested plugins - to install the recommended set of plugins, which are based on most common use cases.

  • Select plugins to install - to choose which set of plugins to initially install. When you first access the plugin selection page, the suggested plugins are selected by default.

If you are not sure what plugins you need, choose Install suggested plugins . You can install (or remove) additional Jenkins plugins at a later point in time via the Manage Jenkins > Manage Plugins page in Jenkins.

The setup wizard shows the progression of Jenkins being configured and your chosen set of Jenkins plugins being installed. This process may take a few minutes.

Creating the first administrator user

Finally, after customizing Jenkins with plugins , Jenkins asks you to create your first administrator user.

  1. When the Create First Admin User page appears, specify the details for your administrator user in the respective fields and click Save and Finish .

  2. When the Jenkins is ready page appears, click Start using Jenkins .
    Notes:

    • This page may indicate Jenkins is almost ready! instead and if so, click Restart .

    • If the page does not automatically refresh after a minute, use your web browser to refresh the page manually.

  3. If required, log in to Jenkins with the credentials of the user you just created and you are ready to start using Jenkins!



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Windows

Windows

Table of Contents
  • Prerequisites
  • Installation steps using Windows MSI installer
  • Silent Install with the MSI installers
  • Post-installation setup wizard
    • Unlocking Jenkins
    • Customizing Jenkins with plugins
    • Creating the first administrator user
  • Troubleshooting Windows installation
    • Invalid service logon credentials

The simplest way to install Jenkins on Windows is to use the Jenkins Windows installer. That program will install Jenkins as a service using a 64 bit JVM chosen by the user. Keep in mind that to run Jenkins as a service, the account that runs Jenkins must have permission to login as a service.

Prerequisites

Minimum hardware requirements:

  • 256 MB of RAM

  • 1 GB of drive space (although 10 GB is a recommended minimum if running Jenkins as a Docker container)

Recommended hardware configuration for a small team:

  • 4 GB+ of RAM

  • 50 GB+ of drive space

Comprehensive hardware recommendations:

  • Hardware: see the Hardware Recommendations page

Software requirements:

  • Java: see the Java Requirements page

  • Web browser: see the Web Browser Compatibility page

  • For Windows operating system: Windows Support Policy

  • For Linux operating system: Linux Support Policy

  • For servlet containers: Servlet Container Support Policy

Installation steps using Windows MSI installer

How to install Jenkins on Windows

Refer to the Windows section of the Downloading Jenkins page to download either an LTS release or a weekly release of the Windows installer. After the download completes, open the Windows installer and follow the steps below to install Jenkins.

Step 1: Setup wizard

On opening the Windows Installer, an Installation Setup Wizard appears, Click Next on the Setup Wizard to start your installation.

Windows Installation Setup Wizard

Step 2: Select destination folder

Select the destination folder to store your Jenkins Installation and click Next to continue.

Jenkins Installation Destination

Step 3: Service logon credentials

When Installing Jenkins, it is recommended to install and run Jenkins as an independent windows service using a local or domain user as it is much safer than running Jenkins using LocalSystem(Windows equivalent of root) which will grant Jenkins full access to your machine and services.

To run Jenkins service using a local or domain user , specify the domain user name and password with which you want to run Jenkins, click on Test Credentials to test your domain credentials and click on Next .

Jenkins Service Logon Credentials

If you get Invalid Logon Error pop-up while trying to test your credentials, follow the steps explained here to resolve it.
Step 4: Port selection

Specify the port on which Jenkins will be running, Test Port button to validate whether the specified port if free on your machine or not. Consequently, if the port is free, it will show a green tick mark as shown below, then click on Next .

Jenkins Select Port

Step 5: Select Java home directory

The installation process checks for Java on your machine and prefills the dialog with the Java home directory. If the needed Java version is not installed on your machine, you will be prompted to install it.

Once your Java home directory has been selected, click on Next to continue.

Select Java Home Directory

Step 6: Custom setup

Select other services that need to be installed with Jenkins and click on Next .

Jenkins Custom Setup

Step 7: Install Jenkins

Click on the Install button to start the installation of Jenkins.

Windows Install Jenkins

Additionally, clicking on the Install button will show the progress bar of installation, as shown below:

Windows Installation Progress

Step 8: Finish Jenkins installation

Once the installation completes, click on Finish to complete the installation.

Jenkins will be installed as a Windows Service . You can validate this by browsing the services section, as shown below:

Windows Jenkins Service

See the upgrade steps when you upgrade to a new release.

Silent Install with the MSI installers

MSI installers can be installed via a silent method, which can show basic UI (/qb) or no UI at all (/qn). The silent method does not prompt for user input so there are properties that you can pass to the installer to set the specific values. A very basic command line is shown below for a silent install.

msiexec.exe /i "path\to\jenkins.msi" /qn /norestart
This will use all of the default values for things that would normally be a prompt such as:
  • Installation directory

  • Service account username/password

  • Java installation directory

  • The port for Jenkins to listen on

Each of these things can be overridden by passing a NAME=VALUE property pair for what you want to override:

Property Name Description

INSTALLDIR

Path to the directory to install Jenkins. (Default: C:\Program Files\Jenkins)

PORT

The port Jenkins will listen on. (Default: 8080)

JAVA_HOME

The directory where java.exe can be found. (Default: The first Java runtime found in the registry with Java 11 being higher priority than Java 17)

SERVICE_USERNAME

The username that the service should run as. The account must have LogonAsService permissions. (Default: In silent mode, the LOCALSYSTEM account)

SERVICE_PASSWORD

The password for the SERVICE_USERNAME account. This should only be provided if SERVICE_USERNAME is provided. (Default: In silent mode, none for LOCALSYSTEM)

A more complex example, including the creation of a log file for the installation process is shown below:

msiexec.exe /i "path\to\jenkins.msi" /qn /norestart INSTALLDIR="D:\Jenkins" JAVA_HOME="C:\Program Files\SomeJava" PORT=80 /L*v "path\to\logfile.txt"

This would install Jenkins into D:\Jenkins, use the Java runtime from C:\Program Files\SomeJava and Jenkins would be listening on port 80.

Post-installation setup wizard

After downloading, installing and running Jenkins, the post-installation setup wizard begins.

This setup wizard takes you through a few quick "one-off" steps to unlock Jenkins, customize it with plugins and create the first administrator user through which you can continue accessing Jenkins.

Unlocking Jenkins

When you first access a new Jenkins instance, you are asked to unlock it using an automatically-generated password.

Step 1

Browse to http://localhost:8080 (or whichever port you configured for Jenkins when installing it) and wait until the Unlock Jenkins page appears.

Unlock Jenkins page

Step 2

The initial Administrator password should be found under the Jenkins installation path (set at Step 2 in Jenkins Installation).

For default installation location to C:\Program Files\Jenkins, a file called initialAdminPassword can be found under C:\Program Files\Jenkins\secrets.

However, If a custom path for Jenkins installation was selected, then you should check that location for initialAdminPassword file.

Jenkins Initial Password Location

Step 3

Open the highlighted file and copy the content of the initialAdminPassword file.

Jenkins Initial Password File

Step 4

On the Unlock Jenkins page, paste this password into the Administrator password field and click Continue .
Notes:

  • You can also access Jenkins logs in the jenkins.err.log file in your Jenkins directory specified during the installation.

  • The Jenkins log file is another location (in the Jenkins home directory) where the initial password can also be obtained. Windows Jenkins Log File This password must be entered in the setup wizard on new Jenkins installations before you can access Jenkins’s main UI. This password also serves as the default administrator account’s password (with username "admin") if you happen to skip the subsequent user-creation step in the setup wizard.

Customizing Jenkins with plugins

After unlocking Jenkins, the Customize Jenkins page appears. Here you can install any number of useful plugins as part of your initial setup.

Click one of the two options shown:

  • Install suggested plugins - to install the recommended set of plugins, which are based on most common use cases.

  • Select plugins to install - to choose which set of plugins to initially install. When you first access the plugin selection page, the suggested plugins are selected by default.

If you are not sure what plugins you need, choose Install suggested plugins . You can install (or remove) additional Jenkins plugins at a later point in time via the Manage Jenkins > Manage Plugins page in Jenkins.

The setup wizard shows the progression of Jenkins being configured and your chosen set of Jenkins plugins being installed. This process may take a few minutes.

Creating the first administrator user

Finally, after customizing Jenkins with plugins , Jenkins asks you to create your first administrator user.

  1. When the Create First Admin User page appears, specify the details for your administrator user in the respective fields and click Save and Finish .

  2. When the Jenkins is ready page appears, click Start using Jenkins .
    Notes:

    • This page may indicate Jenkins is almost ready! instead and if so, click Restart .

    • If the page does not automatically refresh after a minute, use your web browser to refresh the page manually.

  3. If required, log in to Jenkins with the credentials of the user you just created and you are ready to start using Jenkins!

Troubleshooting Windows installation

Invalid service logon credentials

Invalid Service Logon Credentials

When installing a service to run under a domain user account, the account must have the right to logon as a service. This logon permission applies strictly to the local computer and must be granted in the Local Security Policy.

Perform the following steps below to edit the Local Security Policy of the computer you want to define the ‘logon as a service’ permission:

  1. Logon to the computer with administrative privileges.

  2. Open the Administrative Tools and open the Local Security Policy

  3. If the Local Security Policy is missing in your system, refer to the answer in the Where to download GPEdit.msc for Windows 10 Home? question on Microsoft Community to troubleshoot

  4. Expand Local Policy and click on User Rights Assignment

  5. In the right pane, right-click Log on as a service and select properties.

  6. Click on the Add User or Group… button to add the new user.

  7. In the Select Users or Groups dialogue, find the user you wish to enter and click OK

  8. Click OK in the Log on as a service Properties to save changes.

After completing the steps above, try logging in again with the added user.



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About Jenkins

About Jenkins

The Manage Jenkins >> About Jenkins page shows the current release of Jenkins on your system plus information about licenses for all components. The top of the display shows the release and version of Jenkins that is running.

The following information about your Jenkins cluster is also provided:

  • List of all third-party libraries used for this release of Jenkins, with links to licensing details about each library.

  • List of static resources that are installed.

  • List of installed plugins, each of which includes a link to the page that shows all third-party dependencies for each plugin with a link to licensing details about each library.

This video shares different methods to check the version of Jenkins being used.

What is the latest version of Jenkins?


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Built-In Node Name and Label Migration

Built-In Node Name and Label Migration

As part of the terminology cleanup effort, the built-in node was renamed from "master node" to "built-in node" in Jenkins 2.307 and in Jenkins 2.319.1. This is not just a change affecting the UI and documentation: The node name affects the implicitly assigned label of the node (and consequently the NODE_LABELS environment variable), as well as the NODE_NAME environment variable.

The NODE_NAME environment variable in Pipelines is set by the Pipeline: Nodes and Processes plugin. In plugin version 2.39 and earlier, this value is always master . Update to version 2.40 or newer to get consistent behavior between job types.

Affected Features

Jenkins features using node labels are therefore potentially impacted by any such changes. These features include:

  • Label assignments of various project types, both on the top level (e.g. Freestyle jobs) and within jobs (e.g. node statements in Scripted Pipeline, label parameters to agent sections in Declarative Pipeline, or Matrix Project axes).

  • Label assignments of features like custom tool auto-installers, typically used to distinguish OS platforms.

  • Any custom build scripts whose behavior is different based on the NODE_NAME or NODE_LABELS environment variables (or their env global variable equivalent in Pipeline).

  • Any similar features in plugins.

Migration

Due to the potential impact to build behavior, instances upgrading Jenkins to version 2.307 or newer do not automatically get these behavior changes applied. Instead, an administrative monitor informs administrators about this change and allows them to apply it.

Before applying the built-in node name and label migration, administrators are advised to review their configuration and build scripts to assess the impact to their instance and jobs.

Most problems with label assignments can likely be worked around by manually assigning the label master to the built-in node and then migrating affected configuration incrementally to not need this workaround.

Plugin Compatibility

Known Incompatible Plugins

  • Pipeline: Nodes and Processes always sets the NODE_NAME to master in Pipelines before version 2.40.

  • Node and Label Parameter plugin displays the controller node as master in releases before version 1.10.0.

Use this Jira query to find compatibility issues tracked in the Jenkins Jira.

Use this GitHub query to find compatibility issues tracked on GitHub.

Reporting Incompatible Plugins

Please report problems in the respective plugin’s issue tracker.

If the affected plugin uses the Jenkins Jira to track issues, please add the label built-in-node-migration-regression .

If the affected plugin tracks issues on GitHub, please make sure to mention the Jenkins pull request that implemented the change in your issue.

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